WORLD OF SOUL MOTORCYCLE COMMUNITY

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Honoring Black History in Motorcycling - William B. Johnson

William B. Johnson was the first African American H-D motorcycle dealer and the first African American licensed to compete in national motorcycle competition. 

Wild Bill was born in the 1890s and was known around his town as a guy who had a way with machines. In an old blacksmith shop in Westchester Country N.Y. he opened his own place where he fixed machines, including bicycles and the new motorcycles. An accomplished rider, when the AMA wanted to hold a motorcycle hill climb on a piece of property in his town, the property owner insisted Wild Bill compete. The AMA leadership allowed it, and William B. Johnson was the first African-American man to be granted an AMA card, though he sometimes had to tell organizers he was a Native American in order to race. That little blacksmith shop soon became a full-fledged Harley-Davidson dealership, and Johnson went on run it and ride until his 80s, dying in 1985.

Source: https://www.hdforums.com/how-tos/slideshows/7-important-affrican-am...

William B. Johnson in his Harley-Davidson dealership in Somers Hamlet, Somers, NY.  Mr Johnson is noted as the first African-American Harley-Davidson dealer in the U.S.

IT'S YOUR TURN TO MAKE HISTORY

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